The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in June that President Trump’s travel ban could proceed, but it could not be enforced against anyone with a “bona fide connection” to a U.S. person or entity. The ruling, however, was ambiguous because the Court only provided two examples of relatives who would be excluded from the travel ban: a mother-in-law and a spouse.

The Trump administration subsequently released instructions for enforcing the ban. Those guidelines required immigration authorities to enforce the ban against aunts, uncles, grandparents, and other close relatives.

Shortly after, Federal District Judge Derrick Watson ruled that the Trump administration’s interpretation of the Supreme Court’s ruling was too narrow. According to CNN, Watson ruled that grandparents and other close relatives are excluded from the ban. The Trump administration then asked the Supreme Court to put that decision on hold, but the Court left the decision intact, which means that grandparents and other close relatives are excluded from the travel ban.

Although this seems to be a victory for foreign nationals from the six affected countries (Somalia, Syria, Iran, Yemen, Libya, and Sudan), people arriving from those nations could still face problems if they do not have evidence to prove their “bona fide connection” with a U.S. person or entity.

If you think the travel ban could prevent you or a family member from entering the United States, contact the O’Brien Law Group. Rusty O’Brien has more than 10 years of experience helping families and individuals navigate the U.S. immigration system. He will help you gather the necessary documentation to prove that you should not be affected by the travel ban. Call 502-400-7890 to schedule a consultation with a green card lawyer in Louisville.

Who Is Affected by the Travel Ban?

As Immigration Impact explains, the travel ban applies to all foreign nationals from the six affected countries who do not have a qualifying connection with a U.S. entity or person. Even if you have a qualifying connection, you might have trouble entering the country if you formed that connection after June 26, 2017.

You will not be affected by the ban if you were issued an immigrant or non-immigrant visa before June 26. You also should not have problems entering the country if you are here to attend a university, work a job with a U.S. company that invited you, or give a speech.

The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to determine whether the travel ban is lawful in October.

If you are worried that the travel ban will prevent you or a loved one from entering the United States, turn to the O’Brien Law Group for comprehensive guidance through every step of your immigration proceedings. Mr. O’Brien is the former MidSouth region chapter chair of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. He regularly represents clients before the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) and numerous U.S. consulates and embassies abroad. Call 502-400-7890 today to schedule a consultation with an immigration attorney in Louisville.

 

 

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